Business Travelers Increasingly Use Lyft Ride-Sharing Services

September 18, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

It used to be that, when you needed to get across town or to the airport, a loud whistle or the wave of an arm would bring a car to your feet. There was a time when a cab was the sole form of a solo ride for pedestrians.

Then Uber hit the streets, which began to threaten the public transportation mainstay; coming in from the back of the pack was Lyft. These days, the tried-and-true method has been overtaken by a sleeker, newer model, and ground transportation is becoming a neck-and-neck race between two contenders. And it’s the taxis that may be left out in the cold.

Lyft usage is increasing among business travelersAccording to USA Today, Certify, a business expense tracking company, reported that Lyft is seeing more growth than Uber and the “old-fashioned” taxi.

Certify examined more than 10 million travel receipts and expenses from North America, and found an eight percent increase in market share for Lyft in the second quarter of 2018. Meanwhile, Uber and taxis declined three percent and five percent respectively.

Uber still remains king of ride-hailing with nearly three-quarters of the market (74 percent), having a significant lead over Lyft, clocking a mere 19 percent. Cabs trail significantly with their less than double-digit share of 7 percent.

Ride-hailing services are on the move, according to Certify. The company, which began tracking the market in 2014, reported that Uber had 26 percent of transportation expenses and taxis dominated with 74 percent. At that time, Lyft had less than one percent of market share.

Talk about a comeback.

Uber can also claim the title of costliest, as business travelers spent $26 per Uber ride on average and $22.37 for Lyft.

At this rate, it’s possible for Lyft to overtake Uber in a dramatic finish, although it might take a few more years. Only time will tell as the race continues for the 2018 ground transportation championship. While not as fast as NASCAR, at least the courses are more than just left turns.

Technology also helps those business travelers who drive themselves around and might otherwise spend hours looking for parking. Business travelers are increasingly using apps like SpotHero for the much-coveted parking space, according to USA Today. In fact, the use of SpotHero grew 216 percent from Q2 2017 to Q2 2018. This may be something I have to try when I’m driving around Miami.

Business travelers fueled up with driving services too. According to another USA Today article, GrubHub reported 35 percent of all food deliveries last quarter, a 10 percent drop from 2017. Second place went to Uber Eats with an 11 percent increase (25 percent of market share) and DoorDash came in third with 20 percent. Lagging behind with 11 percent was Postmates.

DoorDash dominated in the amount spent for food delivery though. On average, a DoorDash customer spent $75.21. Meanwhile Uber Eats customers paid less than half of that with transactions averaging $34.30.

Business travelers, do you use ride sharing services like Lyft and Uber? Or do you stick with the tried-and-true taxis and car services? How about your food delivery? Tell us your favorite methods of travel and food delivery on our Facebook page, or on our Twitter stream.

Photo credit: PraiseLightMedia (Wikimedia Commons, Creative Commons 4.0)

Lights Out for These Hotel Mattress Myths

September 18, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

Ah, the hotel bed. Sometimes it’s a real crap shoot as to whether you find a comfortable bed like you’ve got at home, or something that should be outlawed by the Geneva Convention. If you don’t sleep well while you’re traveling, it may not just be that you’re away from home. It may be that your bed is, well, terrible. Or at least, not very comfortable.

While hotels advertise that their beds will give you “sweet dreams” and dispel any idea of counting sheep, not all guests would support those claims.

According to published reports in a USA Today article, two recent surveys say guests aren’t buying the idea of amazing beds.

The article asserts that hotel beds are at best, just plain old average.

Eighty-one percent of travelers say the “single-most important feature” in a hotel room is the bed, according to a hotel guest survey by MattressAdvisor.com. With plenty of guests complaining about poor sleep, not enough sleep, and restless sleep, what’s a weary traveler to do?

First, be picky about where you stay. Choose wisely.

Interestingly, all major US hotel chains source their mattresses from four companies, according to the article. Serta, Simmons, and Sealy scored just 74 out of a possible 100 on Consumer Reports. The unrated Jamison/Solstice is the fourth company.

In other words, the highly touted Marriott Bed is manufactured by the same people who supply mattresses to Motel 6.

Simply said, most beds are not a “nightmare” but they’re also not “dreamy.” They are, plain and simple, “unremarkable”.

The highest-rated property for mattresses is the Holiday Inn Report Panama City Beach. Fabulous beach, great beds.

Don't fall for the hotel mattress hype. Photo of a hotel bed with pillows and some art on the wall.Consider the wakeful—and woeful—tale of Jay Marose, writer/publicist and recent guest of a Los Angeles chain hotel.

The feather bed was so worn, it was like sleeping on a bed of nails,” he said in the USA Today article. “There was no duvet cover. There were four flat sheets in a bedding origami that had nothing to do with comfort, just picture taking. I left early.”

The USA Today reporter, Christopher Elliott, added his own details of nightmarish stays.

I feel his pain. I’m on the road 365 days a year, so I sleep – or perhaps it would be more accurate to say, I don’t sleep – on a lot of beds. I’ve stayed at two of the top-rated sleep hotels, the West Baden Springs Hotel in West Baden, Indiana (No. 2), and the Hotel Emma in San Antonio (No. 8), and I slept well in both of them.

But I’ve also stayed in some really nice places – you know, the kind that charge a mandatory $30-a-night ‘resort fee’ on top of their exorbitant room rate – and felt as if I was sleeping on a stone slab.

So let’s bust these hotel bed myths.

Fact: Not all hotel beds are super-premium. Therefore, people do not necessarily sleep better in them.

Fact: The hype about hotel beds is simply a marketing concept. So, no need to purchase one for your very own. You can get one that’s just as good from the regular mattress store.

Fact: Hotel mattresses are fairly generic and average. They are not proprietary and specially made for the hotel. Remember, there are only four sources of mattresses for all hotels.

So, what’s a weary traveler to do?

Learn how to spot a poor mattress. You probably already know what makes up a poor mattress, but maybe didn’t realize it. Does it sag? Can you sit on the edge comfortably?

Harrison Doan, director of analytics at Saatva, a mattress company, told USA Today:

“Checking these things can give you an idea of the mattress quality as well as the quality of sleep you can expect from it,” he said. “Is the stitching clean and consistent? Is the padding on the top of the mattress thick enough to make a difference or just a thin layer thrown on to look nice?”

You can also improve your sleep by making a few room adjustments. The first thing Paul Bromen, publisher of Uponamattress.com suggests is chilling. No, not you. Your room. Turning down the air conditioner a few degrees.

Next, he says bring your own pillow (although we don’t recommend it if you’re flying and only taking a carry-on bag). And be sure to bring a little masking tape to cover up any LEDs scattered around your room.

Bottom line: Don’t believe the hype about a hotel’s mattresses. Unless they tell you they have a memory foam mattress or some exotic mattress handmade by scientists and artisans, don’t fall for it. A hotel mattress is a hotel mattress. Stay at a hotel for the overall experience, not the mattress.

What has been your experience with hotel mattresses and sleeping experiences? Where did you get your best night’s sleep on the road? Tell us about it on our Facebook page, or on our Twitter stream.

Photo credit: Olichel (Pixabay, Creative Commons 0)

Business Travel is Best Perk for Millennial Professionals

September 6, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

If you employ a lot of Millennials — the generation between ages 19 and 38 — you may appreciate knowing they consider business travel to be a major perk, and they actually enjoy it. So much, in fact, that many of them will often create reasons to take a trip.

(This may be welcome news to the seasoned travel veterans who are just as happy to stay home.)

Approximately 75 percent of young professionals describe business travel as a serious bonus to their work, with 65 percent considering it to be a status symbol, according to a new study commissioned by Hilton Hotels & Resorts.

Millennials like business travel enough that it's a major perk for them.Business travelers between 23 and 35 shared positive responses toward travel and more than half admitted creating a reason to travel for work. Globetrotting is such a perk that 39 percent say they would refuse a job offer if travel wasn’t required.

One of the perks, according to the young professionals is making friends. In fact, 75 percent have widened their circle of friends. Another is getting more accomplished while meeting in person. Eighty-one percent achieve more while face-to-face.

However, not all is rosy for the young globetrotters. The study found travelers face several issues:

  • Sixty-five percent admitted packing workout gear but not using it. Wanting to work out and doing so on a business trip were two different things. Moreover, 44 percent gained weight on their business trips.
  • Another wardrobe “malfunction” was packing in general: 36 percent are stressed by the idea of packing for every situation. (Hint: Don’t do that. Plan your wardrobe and events ahead.)
  • Writing up expense reports was another issue. Forty-three percent of travelers ended up owing their company money because they didn’t understand what they could expense.
  • The anticipation of pending business travel caused stress for thirty-eight percent of the professionals. Weekends were filled with dread.

Enjoying new places on the company’s tab is great, so great that 69 percent wish they could extend their trip for a little leisure trip. However, nearly half of them feel guilty about doing it, and worry it makes a bad impression on senior leadership.

Since Millennials make up such a large part of business travelers these days, Hilton Hotels has tried to help young professionals based on these findings.

For example, Hilton guests can now use the chain’s in-room wellness concept and in-room delivery service as a means to avoid disruption of fitness routines. They also offer a variety of health-conscious menu packages.

They also offer packing advice for a week’s worth of travel: they call it the 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 Rule which means packing one hat, two pairs of shoes, three pairs of pants/skirts, four shirts, five pairs of socks, and six pairs of underwear. Also, keeping clothes in the same color palette can keep everything simple and coordinated. With this combination, you can travel for at least 10 – 12 days, although you may need to do some laundry while you’re away.

What about you, Millennials? What has been your business travel experience? Do you work out, or take bleisure time, or have issues with your expense reports? Share your concerns and stories with us on our Facebook page, or on our Twitter stream.

Photo credit: Author unknown (PXHere.com, Creative Commons 0/Public Domain)

No Powders Will be Allowed onto Planes, says TSA

August 28, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

Starting June 30 it will be more difficult for international travelers to bring powders on their trips, at least in large quantities. The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) has adopted a stricter policy on baby powder, protein powder, dry spices, coffee, tea, and more through airport security.

Basically, the new regulation states that any passenger on an inbound international flight with 12 ounces or more of powder might be subject to additional screening at security checkpoints. What’s more, if TSA agents can’t identify the powder, then it may be confiscated and thrown away. So while it may not be a problem for coffee and tea drinkers, since that’s easily identifiable, certain spices may pose a potential problem.

The TSA is no longer allowing powders on inbound flights from foreign points of origin.This means even dry baby formula could be subject to a search or even confiscation. Of course, this only affects international flights coming into the US. Flying from North Carolina to visit your sister in Portland, Oregon is still okay.

Still, if you’re trying to bring large amounts of powder through security, you may want to consider shipping it to your final destination anyway. This policy might not be limited only to inbound international flights for very long; it’s possible it could expand to domestic flights in the future.

The change was a result of increased security concerns: July 2017 saw a failed terrorist attack in Australia when someone tried to blow up an Etihad Airways flight with a powder explosive. This has put everyone on alert, and now we have to be concerned about how much powder we travel with in our luggage. However, the TSA has said this was not the only reason for the policy change.

Most international airlines have voluntarily implemented screening for powder according to the TSA. Canada, for example, has added powder and granular material to its list of items prohibited on flights, although baby formula, protein powder, coffee, and tea in any quantity are still allowed.

The TSA will also ask foreign airports with flights into the U.S. to adopt the same policy.

How will you be affected by this policy? Do you travel with larger amounts of powder in your luggage? (Be sure to pack it in a resealable bag, in case something goes wrong.) Tell us how you travel with powder in the comments below, on our Facebook page, or on our Twitter page.

Photo credit: Transportation Safety Administration, (Wikimedia, Public Domain)

Airline Complaints Drop in April 2018, Rise in May

August 23, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

Just like airplanes, airline complaints are going up and down. For the most part, airlines are continuing to improve their baggage handling rates and reducing the number of canceled flights, which is leading to fewer complaints from passengers.

Thanks to new baggage handling technology and better planning and scheduling, we’re seeing fewer issues for passengers, which is putting travelers in a better mood, at least for the month of April.

One of the common airline complaints is about arrival and departure times.According to the Bureau of Transportation Statistics, the dozen airlines that report baggage handling issues had 2.39 cases of mishandled bags for every 1,000 passengers, as reported in April 2018.

That’s a drop from March which had 2.59. What’s more, April 2017 saw a rate of 2.5, so there was an improvement from month to month, as well as year-over-year.

Unfortunately, things headed the other way in May. There were fewer complaints in May — 1,102 complaints compared to April’s 1,169 and 1,784 in May 2017 — but there was a slight bump in canceled flights and mishandled bags. The BTS reported 2.59 cases of mishandled bags in May 2018, and the number of canceled flights rose to 1.2 percent, compared to 1 percent in April and 0.8 percent in May 2017.

According to the Bureau’s monthly Air Travel Consumer report, 1,169 airline service complaints were filed in April 2018 as compared to the 1908 filed in April 2017, indicating a drop of nearly 39 percent.

Only 17 airlines report flight operations to the DOT. These 17 airlines had flights arriving within 15 minutes of their ETA an average of 81.3 percent of the time in April, 79.4 percent in May. Of course, this is a moving target with too many variables to keep it consistent: In March, it was 80.9 percent.

Significantly late flights incur penalties, as fines are possible for tarmac delays longer than three hours for domestic flights or four for international flights, and anything over that will often result in an investigation before the fines are assessed.

If you’d like, you can base your travel plans on an airline’s performance. If you want something more likely to be punctual, fly Delta Airlines, Hawaiian Airlines, Endeavor Airlines, and Mesa Airlines — four airlines with high on-time ratings (Mesa and Endeavor swapped places between April and May). Their on-time arrival ratings varied from 83.2 percent (Endeavor in May) to 90.8 percent (Hawaiian in May)

Not so concerned about on-time arrivals, but you want something inexpensive? Southwest Airlines, PSA Airlines, JetBlue Airlines and Frontier Airlines may become your preferred choice. They were the four with the lower on-time arrivals, with Southwest and PSA swapping places between April and May, with on-time arrival rates between 67.6 – 75 percent for the two months.

When it comes to cancellations, April saw Hawaiian, United, and Delta with 0.1 percent, 0.2 percent, and 0.3 percent. In May, the numbers were about the same with Delta achieving a 0.0 percent (only 23 canceled flights), and Hawaiian and Allegiant Air following with 0.1 percent and 0.3 percent.

Conversely, the highest rate of canceled flights is shared by Envoy Air, Republic Airlines, and Endeavor Air in April (3.7, 2.6, and 2.3 percent), and Endeavor, Republic, and Envoy in May (2.6, 2.5, and 2.4 percent, respectively). Overall, airlines canceled a mere 1 percent in April, and 1.2 percent in May.

What do you think of the airline complaints numbers? Is performance and lost baggage a big issue for you? Share your thoughts in the comments below, on our Facebook page, or on our Twitter page.

Photo credit: Joe Mabel (Wikimedia Commons, GNU Free Documentation License)

Which U.S. Airlines Have the Most Economy Class Legroom?

August 21, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

Have you noticed your personal space is shrinking on flights? You’re not imagining things. The space between your seat and the seat in front of you is getting smaller (or maybe a little bigger), depending on your airline. Over time the average seat pitch — the distance between the back of the seat in front of you and the front of your seat back (i.e. your personal space) — has shortened. Only two decades ago the pitch could be anywhere from 34 to 35 inches. Today the legroom is closer to 30 or 31 inches, depending on the airline.

Do you know how much legroom is available in your airplane?There are, however some airlines that may “fit” your need better than others. If you want to stretch your legs and not your budget, here are several airlines and planes worth checking out.

If you don’t want to pay extra for “economy plus” or “premium economy” upgrades in the major airlines, here are the carriers’ current pitch sizes.

  1. JetBlue (32″ – 33″): Their Airbus A321 planes have 33 inches of pitch in economy, so those are used primarily for transcontinental flights. Their Airbus A320s have 32 inches in economy class, thanks to a recent retrofit of their entire fleet.
  2. Alaska Airlines (31″ – 32″): Alaska has a fleet of Airbuses with 32 inches of legroom and a fleet of pre-Virgin America merger Boeing 737s with 31 to 32 inches.
  3. Southwest Airlines (31″ – 32″): Most Southwest planes are Boeing 737-700s with 31 inches of pitch; some of their 737-MAXs and 737-800s have 32 inches.
  4. United Airlines (31″ – 32″): Only their Boeing 787-8 Dreamliners offer up to 32 inches. The rest of their fleet clocks in around 31 inches.
  5. Hawaiian Airlines (30″ – 32″): Hawaiian’s Boeing 717s, which they fly between islands, have 30″ of legroom, but the rest of their fleet — Airbus A330s, A321s, and Boeing 767s — have 31 – 32″.
  6. American Airlines (30″ – 32″): American’s Boeing 757s (for international travel) offer 31 to 32 inches of seat pitch while their Airbus A319s and Boeing 737 MAXs (domestic travel) have 30 inches.
  7. Delta (30″ – 32″): Expect anywhere from 30 to 32 inches of seat pitch, although most have 31 inches available. The least amount of space is found on the Airbus A319s, A320s, A321s, and the Boeing 757s with only 30 inches of legroom.

While this may feel small, all is not lost. You can upgrade to the airline’s Economy Plus/Premium Economy (or whatever your favorite airline calls it) and get up to 40 inches of legroom. If you’re a taller traveler, this can be totally worth it. If you’re shorter, you probably won’t notice the difference.

Of course, you’re looking at a cost between $20 – $200, depending on the airline and the destination. Just remember, wherever you’re headed, seat pitch is important and needs to be a consideration in your flight plans. Don’t just get the cheapest ticket you can find, because it will very likely be one of the most uncomfortable. Spend a few extra dollars so you can at least tolerate the ride without hurting yourself or putting yourself through four hours of torture.

What do you look for in seat pitch and legroom? Do you base your travel choices based on legroom? Tell us about it in the comments below, on our Facebook page, or on our Twitter page.

Photo credit: Matthew Hurst (Flickr, Creative Commons 2.0)

The Dirtiest Place in the Airport is Not What You Think

August 14, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

Often thought of as the filthiest of places, an airport public restroom may not necessarily be the dirtiest place in the airport. What could be worse? Security bins? Ticket counters? The place where you and thousands of other travelers have to take your shoes off?

Curious as to what spot actually is the dirtiest, InsuranceQuotes, a Texas-based insurance company, went to three major U.S. airports and airline flights and performed 18 tests across six different surfaces. Samples were sent off to a laboratory to find the average number of colony forming units (CFU) or bacterial or fungal cells per square inch.

Basically, the more CFUs there are, the more contaminated a surface is.

Self-check-in kiosks is often the dirtiest place in the airport.The results were surprising: self-check kiosks contained the highest level of CFUs with 253,857. Armrests at the gate were second with 21,630 followed by water fountain buttons with 19,181.

It makes sense: all day, countless people tap the same screen to get their tickets, unaware the dirtiest place in the airport is right at their fingertips. The self-check-in kiosk is the one place nearly everyone is forced to touch. Not surprising then is that the world’s business airport, Hartsfield-Jackson, was the germiest of all three subject airports. Just one kiosk alone came back with 1 million CFU.

Remember that “filthy” restroom? An airport toilet contains 172 CFU on average.

The close proximity of other passengers and stale air in the airplane is blamed for illnesses, but maybe it’s the pre-flight contact instead. We may never know.

So what can you do to protect yourself?

The best way is, of course, complete avoidance whenever possible. Check into your flight from your smartphone or at home on your computer (just your germs there).

That being said, if you do find yourself at the airport, here are a few tips for cleaner traveling:

  1. Barefoot is bad! Walking barefoot through security makes you more susceptible to germs and infections like athlete’s foot, so always wear socks through the airport security line.
  2. Hand sanitizer. Carry TSA-approved size mini bottles of hand sanitizer for quick clean ups after touching dirty screens.
  3. Resting your elbows on armrests at your gate is comfortable, but if you wipe them down with disinfectant wipes first, they’ll be comfortable and clean.
  4. No brainer: always, always, always wash your hands after using the restroom. Public or private. Airports and everywhere. Always. Use soap and warm water for seconds; that’s “Happy Birthday” twice or the Alphabet song once.

“Safe travels” has a whole new meaning when you say ‘bon voyage’ to germs.

How do you avoid germs on your trips? What did you think the dirtiest place in the airport was? Tell us about it in the comments below, on our Facebook page, or on our Twitter page.

Photo credit: Marek Ślusarczyk (Wikimedia Commons, Creative Commons 2.5)

Take Care of Yourself if You Travel Frequently

August 7, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

If you travel frequently — 15 or more days a month on business — you can consider yourself a road warrior. But a new study by the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and City University of New York says a better description might be wounded warrior.

The study of 18,000 business travelers who are away from home half the month or more found these individuals struggling greatly with their health. Many have mental health issues such as anxiety and depression, and they are sleep deprived and overly dependent on alcohol. They don’t get exercise and they tend to smoke more than those who don’t spend as much time away from home for work. They also have higher blood pressure and lower than acceptable good cholesterol levels.

Hotel Gym at Casa Velas Hotel in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico. A hotel gym is a great place to work out if you travel frequently.

Hotel Gym at Casa Velas Hotel in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico.

One of the study’s lead authors, Andrew Rundle, wrote in the Harvard Review that “the clustering of all these health conditions among extensive business travelers is worrying, both for their own health and the health of the organizations they work for.” He suggests education both for the individuals as well as for the companies as a good first step toward changing this alarming situation.

“At the individual level, employees who travel extensively need to take responsibility for the decisions they make around diet, exercise, alcohol consumption, and sleep,” Rundle explains. “However, to do this, employees will likely need support in the form of education, training, and a corporate culture that emphasizes healthy business travel.”

Rundle offered practical tips for employees that included being very selective about when travel is absolutely necessary and being honest with themselves about what constant travel is doing to their health and well-being.

One thing he suggested could serve as a tangible affirmation of the company’s commitment to the health of its warriors is providing memberships to national fitness centers for these frequent travelers.

Bottom line: If you travel frequently, please eat healthy, drink plenty of water, get plenty of sleep, and exercise 20 minutes per day, three times a week. That means things like walking to appointments, working out in the hotel gym, or just going for a walk in the evening. Don’t load up on rich heavy meals in restaurants, avoid soda and lots of alcohol, and drink water throughout the day. If you can do that, you can improve your health greatly while you travel.

Do you travel frequently for business? Do you take care of yourself, exercise, and get plenty of sleep, or do you find yourself lacking in a couple of those areas? Tell us about it in the comments below, on our Facebook page, or on our Twitter page.

Photo credit: Casa Velas Hotel (Flickr, Creative Commons 2.0)

American Travelers Really Want Hotel Loyalty Points

July 24, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

How far would you go to earn loyalty points? According to a surprising study by Carlson Wagonlit Travel, some travelers are willing to go farther than you might expect.

American business travelers top the list (47 percent of all respondents) of those willing to risk a certain level of personal safety in order to earn loyalty points from their overnight stay. If given the choice to stay at a property where they’re not a loyalty member or stay where they are, business travelers will choose the loyalty program benefits over their personal safety.

But before you get images of people staying in rough neighborhoods for the sake of a few points, let’s define the sense of “feeling unsafe” most respondents described. Most wouldn’t put themselves in physical danger, but they would be willing to put up with disruptive fellow guests that made them feel uncomfortable. Others (44 percent) said they would disregard their fear of someone breaking into their room so they could earn more points.

The hotel front desk at the JW Marriott in New Orleans, LA. This is where you ask for your hotel upgrade.

The hotel front desk at the JW Marriott in New Orleans, LA.

Among those traveling for business internationally (37 percent), the personal safety concern was less physical. They were concerned their privacy would be breached by their information being given out without their knowledge or someone discovering their room number or procuring a key.

Many respondents also indicated they believed staying on higher floors of a hotel to be safer. Thirty-two percent said they avoid staying on the ground floor if at all possible.

Bottom line? No amount of loyalty points is worth risking your personal safety for. Your work and your life are too important, so don’t take unnecessary risks. Be smart, and don’t make unwise choices. There are other ways to get points!

How far will you go to earn more loyalty points? Where do you draw the line? Leave us a comment on our Facebook page, or on our Twitter page.

Photo credit: Prayitno Wikimedia Commons, Creative Commons 2.0)

More Business Travelers Including Bleisure

July 19, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

We’ve been coaching, cajoling, and cheering you business travelers on when it comes to tacking on some extra personal time before or after your work trip. And Expedia says you’re listening!

Expedia Group Media Solutions commissioned Luth Research to find out more about what you’re doing and how you’re making bleisure work for you. The study asked American, British, Chinese, German, and Indian bleisure travelers to share what influenced their decisions, what resources they used to make their decisions, and what their resulting preferences were after their experiences.

Here’s what they found out.

The first thing Expedia discovered is which group of you is taking advantage of this. Those of you who work in technology, IT, and software—you’re making this work for you once every two to three months after you’ve been on the road for a two-to three-day trip.

Next, Expedia found there’s been a dramatic increase in the number of business travelers taking a couple bleisure days: a 40 percent uptick over the same period in 2016. Sixty percent of business travelers reported turning your work travel into a vacation sometime in the reporting period between March 2017 and March 2018. Bravo!

The British Museum Great Court, a great bleisure stop if you're in London on a business trip.

The British Museum Great Court

While the largest percentage of business travel was to participate in a conference (67 percent), the leading factor in whether or not the destination was considered for bleisure wasn’t proximity to family and friends, but other factors such as the availability of great food, a beach, or the opportunity to check it off your bucket list. Way to multi-task!

Even the time and cost of the bleisure trip had an effect: 37% of respondents said the proximity of their trip to the weekend played a role in their decision; the same number of people said the additional costs of the trip helped them decide. That’s always a good strategy: if you can end a trip on Friday or even Thursday, why not stick around for a nice weekend away? (Or if you can manage it, end your trip on a Monday and then stick around for the rest of the week. We won’t tell.)

Among the most popular US bleisure destinations were New York, LA, Washington, D.C., Chicago, and San Francisco.

What are your bleisure travel habits? What do you do to turn your business travel into a little bit of fun? Share your ideas on our Facebook page, or on our Twitter page.

Photo credit: David Iliff, License: CC-BY-SA 3.0 (Wikimedia Commons)

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