Beyond the Carry-on: Garment Bags

November 14, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 

Garment bags often get a bad rap for being an outdated “box on wheels” predecessor to the Rollaboard® luggage that is seen everywhere today. Not so!

We like garment bags because they offer a streamlined manner of protecting and transporting business apparel in a way that reduces wrinkling. If you travel for business, and are required to wear suits and semi-formal clothing, you may want to consider a garment bag.

For example, you can typically only pack one suit inside the suiter of a regular carry-on. But if you have several suits or jackets, the garment bag allows you to carry several business dress items virtually wrinkle free.

Travelpro Crew 11 Garment Bag

Travelpro Crew 11 Garment Bag

The Crew™ 11 collection features three models, a basic bi-fold and two sizes of rolling garment bags. As with the entire Crew™ 11 collection, all are made of high-quality ballistic nylon fabric with a Duraguard coating, and feature a large exterior pocket and metal hanger clamps to keep your garments secure. All are subjected to strenuous testing to ensure durability of all moving parts and abrasion resistance over the lifetime of the bag. A limited lifetime warranty is also standard for all three models.

The Bi-Fold has an over-the-shoulder padded strap that can be worn crossbody as well, and has a leather carrying handle. It opens like a book and features multiple accessory pockets for separating and organizing contents. A foam padded roll bar and adjustable hold down straps help prevent wrinkling.

Both the Rolling Carry-on Garment Bag and the 50″ Garment Bag feature a high-performance Rollaboard® wheel system with integrated four-point stability system that keeps the bag from tipping when fully packed and standing upright. They also feature our patented Powerscope Extension Handle which reduces wobble when fully extended. The large compartment in each has a padded roll bar and two adjustable hold-down straps for securing up to four garments, as well as compartments for folded shirts fresh from the cleaners and pants. There are also corner pockets for small essentials such as belts, socks, and toiletries.

Do you regularly travel with suits? Are you a garment bag user? What do you typically look for in a garment bag? Share your thoughts with us in the comments below, on our Facebook page, or in our Twitter stream.

Photo credit: TravelproLuggage

2016 Top Quality Rankings for Airlines, Virgin America Ranks #1

November 11, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 

For the past 26 years, Dean Headley, a researcher at Wichita State University’s business school, and Brent Bowen, Dean of the College of Aviation at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, have co-authored the Airline Quality Report, a quality ranking of the largest 13 airlines in the United States.

The report uses performance data gathered from the U.S. Department of Transportation’s monthly Air Travel Consumer Report to determine the intersection of public perception of each airline’s quality with the airline’s actual performance.

Virgin Airline's Molly

This year, Virgin America Airlines earned the top spot for the fourth year in a row. JetBlue jumped from fourth to second place, and Delta retained its third place position. The report examines performance in four categories: on-time performance, baggage handling, involuntary denied boardings, and customer complaints.

This report is an objective way for consumers to determine an airline’s overall performance and to examine its attention to whatever detail of the flying experience is important to them. The report found that overall performance for the industry as a whole improved over 2015, while the category that saw the most change was complaints.
Read more

Avoid Higher Airline Prices for “Open Jaw” Flights

October 19, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 

Recently, the country’s three major airlines each implemented a little change to their pricing models that, if you’re not careful, can end up costing you a lot more per flight.

The change, says The New York Times, could make it up to seven times more expensive for those who fly what’s called an “open jaw” route.
british-airways-boeing-747-400-g-civh-departs-london-heathrow-11apr2015
That’s where you fly to a particular destination, but return home from a different one. For example, if you flew to Miami, but flew home from Orlando, that’s an “open jaw,” or multi-city flight.

We don’t want you to be caught unaware, so here are some things we suggest you do before you purchase a multi-city or open jaw ticket.

  • Check into the cost of two one-way tickets. There’s a very good chance the two tickets will cost less than the one open-jaw flight. The example we saw in the Times story showed a $1200 price tag for a Jacksonville, FL to Los Angeles/San Francisco to Jacksonville. But as two separate tickets, it was $400. Read more

How Airports Can Get Rid of the TSA

October 14, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 

Who hasn’t thought while standing in a slow-moving TSA security line, “Couldn’t somebody do this better than the federal government?” There actually is somebody, and there may be a way for your airport to replace the TSA with a private firm.

And after a very hectic travel summer, with reports of up-to-three-hour waits at some security lines, a lot of people started asking that question.

A relatively unknown program, actually operated by the TSA, called the Partnership Screening Program, allows the federal agency to receive bids from private security firms to replace the TSA’s services at the nation’s municipal airports. The private contractors provide screening under federal oversight, and must offer similar wages and benefits for their employees.

The TSA Security lines at Denver International Airport

In fact, the option to fire the TSA dates back to the inception of the agency in 2002 after the September 11 terrorist attacks. At that time, five airports were allowed to contract with private firms as a way for Congress to assess and compare its approach with one offered by the private sector: San Francisco; Kansas City, MO; Rochester, NY; Tupelo, MS; and Jackson, WY.

Kansas City and San Francisco’s international airports were the only two major airports in that original five. But since then, 17 other regional airports around the country have fired the TSA and, with the exception of Kansas City, contracted with Trinity Technology Group, a Department of Homeland Security Safety Act certified company, for their security screening process. Kansas City works with Akal Security.
Read more

Where Are All The Startup Airlines?

September 30, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 

Gone are the days when airlines struggled just to stay afloat aloft. Gas is plentiful and affordable, and profits are soaring. So why aren’t there more startup airlines available?

Bankruptcies and consolidations of existing airlines may be scaring off would-be entrepreneurs, although the typical triggers of price overreaches and abandoned regions by the bigger airlines haven’t spurred many to action.

The predominant problem seems to be the maturity of the industry, and the streamlined nature of the business overall. Four major carriers control 85 percent of the market share, so the battle for entry really boils down to one of real estate access.

JetBlue, one of the more recent startup airlines.

Alex Wilcox, once an intern at Southwest and an executive for JetBlue and Virgin Atlantic Airways Ltd., has found real estate available at airports in need of shorter flights. His new venture, JetSuite, has developed a business model based on charging travelers no more than $1 per mile of the flight and flying routes the larger airlines have abandoned. Most flights max out at $300.

The company bought 10 Embraer E-135s that had been part of the now-defunct American Eagle fleet, then spent $1 million each to retrofit them with new seats, wifi, power outlets, and other amenities. They’re focusing on providing expedited service, specifically targeting travelers who don’t want to deal with security delays at larger airports, and amenities typically found only in charter jet service in order to compete for customers.
Read more

Beyond the Carry-on: Travelpro Totes

September 28, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 

With so many travelers trying to streamline what they use to manage their essentials, knowing all your “personal item” luggage options could make what you carry onboard more efficient. Maybe you’re checking a large suitcase, but still want to take a small personal bag on the plane with you. Or maybe you’re only traveling for a single overnight trip, and a normal rollaboard is too big.

This is where a tote can help out. They’re smaller, lighter, and easier to carry or roll. Here are a few features you should look for in a travel tote.

Navy Travelpro Crew 11 Business Totes

Navy Travelpro Crew 11 Business Tote

First, just because a tote is lightweight doesn’t mean it shouldn’t be durable. A good tote won’t sacrifice quality and durability for the sake of being lighter. For example, we make our Crew™ 11 Deluxe Tote with the same high-quality ballistic nylon fabric as our other Crew 11 luggage. It’s also thoroughly tested to withstand the same rigors of frequent business travel.

Your tote should also be comfortable to carry. Look for an adjustable strap with a padded shoulder pad so you can wear it hands-free, either over the shoulder or across your body. Look for leather handles so it’s comfortable to carry as well.
Read more

This is What Air Travel Will Look Like in 100 Years

September 23, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 

The United States turned 240 years old this year. If you think about where we were in terms of transportation at the dawn of our nation, compared to the technological advancements we have experienced just since 2000, the tantalizing possibilities of the future of air travel are mind boggling.

According to Boeing Senior Technical Fellows Brian Tillotson and Kevin Bowcutt, space travel and hypersonics will be at the forefront of aviation innovation. Boeing, which is celebrating its centennial this year, talked with Travel + Leisure about its dreams and goals. Some of these may come to fruition as early as 2035.

The Harrier Jump Jet's VTOL may be a model for one of the future features of air travel

The Harrier Jump Jet, one of the most famous and successful fixed-wing single-engine VTOL aircraft. It can take off and land in areas without a long runway.

  • Tillotson speculates air travel will begin at home with the plane coming to pick you up at your residence, and takeoff and landing will most likely be vertical.
  • You may be able to book a flight simply by thinking about it. This may seem far fetched, but with advancements in mobile devices and wearable technology, it may end up looking, according to Bowcutt, like an evolved version of Uber.
  • Tillotson forecasts that airport security will be the product of many linked networks, allowing law enforcement to more easily identify those with criminal histories.
  • Planes may be transparent, according to Tillotson, in order to help maintenance crews identify problems more quickly. It’s also possible, with this kind of construction, that every surface could double as a display screen, allowing for efficient troubleshooting.
  • Airplanes will become smarter, according to Bowcutt, utilizing software that will alert maintenance personnel when a part is wearing out so that mechanical delays become a thing of the past. This should improve safety and reduce costs. Read more

Airlines Working to Eliminate Jet Lag

August 24, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 

Wouldn’t it be wonderful if Elon Musk’s Hyperloop train existed right now, and could travel from New York to LA in 45 minutes? We would never experience any of the ill effects of time zone travel. While jet lag still exists because the Hyperloop doesn’t, airlines and science are looking for some natural ways to help your body prepare for the adjustment to your new locale and reduce jet lag symptoms.

This prompted Fast Company to ask whether we’re on the verge of eliminating jet lag. Short answer, no. But we may be getting closer.

For one thing, airlines that offer long haul and international flights have begun experimenting with LED lighting in the cabin to mimic the time zone destination of the flight.

Sleeping on a plane can help with jet lag, but only if done at the right time.“It turns out you can pretty heavily manipulate levels of melatonin in the body by exposing people to different wavelengths of light,” David Cosenza told Fast Company. He’s a project manager for Lumileds, a company that manufacturers the LED lights that are now used in the new Airbus A380 XWB and the Boeing 787 Dreamliner.

While you may have no control over the light you’re exposed to as you fly, you can prepare your body using one essential oil and a supplement. Rosemary oil, either applied to the skin or added by the drop to a bottle of water, relieves cramping and nausea, promotes digestion, aids circulation, boosts the immune system, and eases respiratory systems working with recycled plane air.

Also, consuming turmeric — in tea, as a supplement, or as an ingredient in your meals — will help you avoid headaches when flying. Its powerful anti-inflammatory agents require some planning, though, so begin incorporating it into your diet up to three days in advance of your travel.

Speaking of your diet, consider choosing lean protein if you want to remain awake once you reach your destination. Turkey, chicken, and fish satiate and provide extended release energy, which will help you transition to your new time zone. Avoiding fatty foods, which induce sleep, is key. Alcohol and caffeine actually inhibit restorative sleep, so choose water or an herbal tea throughout the course of your travel so that there’s nothing to block your body’s natural circadian rhythm.

These natural methods of curbing jet lag will have you alert and ready to go when you reach your destination.

How do you beat jet lag? Do you have any tips or tricks? Share them with us in the comments below, on our Facebook page, or in our Twitter stream.

Photo credit: Ian MacKenzie (Flickr, Creative Commons)

What Tests Does Travelpro Put Crew™ 11 Luggage Through?

August 19, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 

Road warriors and frequent business travelers need luggage that will see them through hundreds of thousands of miles and hundreds of hours in the air. You need something that will last for years and not fail on you at the most inopportune moment.

Travelpro Crew 11 Group Photo

Travelpro Crew 11 Collection

So you may be interested in learning just how thoroughly tested the Crew™ 11 luggage collection is. Crew 11 is the sister collection to our FlightCrew™ 5 collection, which is made specifically for flight professionals. (Our founder, Bob Plath, was originally a pilot for Northwestern Airlines when he invented the Rollaboard Carry-on suitcase, so he understood what flight professionals put their bags through.)

As you would suspect, we have tested every element of Crew 11 with a series of machines developed to test the strength and durability of all our models. For example, the top and side carry handles are put through a jerk test by attaching a fully loaded bag to a machine that roughly lifts, drops, and jerks it, testing the handles as well as the screws that secure them to the bag.

Our high performance wheels are tested for mile after mile over multiple surface types to simulate road warrior usage.
Read more

Shopping for Luggage: Lightweight Durability

August 15, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 

Using “lightweight” and “durability” in the same sentence when describing luggage may seem like an oxymoron. Duffel bags have long been lightweight; heavier hardshell case bags have been durable. And that’s the way it has always been.

Mostly.

Travelpro Crew 11 Luggage Collection

The new Travelpro Crew 11 luggage collection

When it comes to “lightweight durability,” at Travelpro®, we have built our reputation on marrying the two.

It’s simple science: The lighter the bag, the more you can put into the bag to meet the maximum allowable rate. With airlines instituting weight limits for checked baggage, and carry-ons for international travel, the empty weight of luggage matters.

It all starts with the lightweight frame, which has been subjected to (and exceeded) rigorous testing criteria. And while all of our collections have new design innovations, let’s focus on Crew™ 11, the sister collection to our FlightCrew™ 5 collection, which is used extensively by flight professionals.
Read more

« Previous PageNext Page »