Travelpro Debuts the Crew Executive Choice Business Case Collection (PRESS RELEASE)

September 10, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

Providing the Most Innovative Luggage and Business Cases for Today’s Frequent Business Travelers

Travelpro, the inventor of Rollaboard luggage and a market leader in innovative, high-quality luggage design is pleased to introduce the Crew Executive Choice Business Case Collection. This premium business case line enhances Travelpro’s flagship Crew luggage collection by integrating some highly functional briefcases, backpacks and overnighters into the overall offering. Genuine leather accents and durable fabrics enable the business traveler to travel in confidence with the latest advances in luggage and business cases, all from one compatible product offering.

“The Crew Executive Choice Collection’s attention to detail, confident style and functional efficiency are a reflection of Travelpro’s commitment to its customers and business travelers worldwide,” said Scott Applebee, Vice President of Marketing for the Travelpro family of brands.

Crew Executive Choice Collection

Crew Executive Choice Collection


The Crew Executive Choice Rolling Business Overnighter is an ideal choice for the executive that demands it all: durability, convenience, versatility and a fashionable look that makes a bold statement. An ideal carry-on size for short trips, the Rolling Business Overnighter is built for maximum efficiency with a patented PowerScope Extension handle, which minimizes wobble when fully extended and stops at 42″ ensuring a comfortable roll for users of varying heights. A built-in corduroy, padded pocket protects laptops up to 15.6″ in size, and the business organizer keeps pens, pencils, business cards and keys in place for easy access.

Crew Executive Choice Checkpoint-Friendly Backpack

Crew Executive Choice Checkpoint-Friendly Backpack

The Checkpoint Friendly Computer Backpack is the perfect complement to Travelpro Crew 10 Carry-on luggage. With its one-of-a-kind Quick Loop system, the Backpack can be attached to all existing Travelpro luggage for convenient transport through airport terminals. The Backpack also provides protection against loss and identity theft with an RFID-blocking pocket that keeps all credit cards and passports safe. The highly featured backpack is Checkpoint Friendly, featuring a padded pocket for 15.6″ laptops, plus a tablet pocket and a removable cord pouch for power cables and accessories. Adjustable, padded shoulder straps provide comfort for users of different heights.

Genuine leather handles combined with sturdy nylon fabric make the Checkpoint Friendly Messenger Brief and Checkpoint Friendly Slim Brief, a stylish and damage resistant option for business travelers on the go. Checkpoint friendly design allows the traveler to keep their laptop inside the bag while going through the security x-ray machine at the airport. Each item is equipped with a RFID-blocking security pocket, Quick Loop system, a padded and quilted corduroy pocket that fits a 15.6″ laptop, a separate, padded tablet pocket and a built-in business organizer for quick access storage of key business essentials.

The Business Tote is the ideal case for the female business traveler who wants to combine style and functionality. The tote features a removable padded sleeve for laptops up to 15.6″ and a separate tablet pocket to protect multiple electronic devices safely. A removable cord pouch, RFID-blocking security pocket and business organizer keeps everything organized and safe. Genuine leather straps and trim add a touch of elegance and style.

About Travelpro

For over 25 years, Travelpro International has prided itself on design innovation and durability in crafting the highest quality luggage for travelers worldwide. Since transforming the ease of modern day travel with The Original Rollaboard wheeled luggage, Travelpro has been the brand of choice for flight crews and frequent travelers worldwide. Travelpro is dedicated to building a lifelong relationship with its customers by consistently understanding and exceeding their needs. Travelpro was honored to receive the New Product Innovation Award from the Travel Goods Association (TGA) in March 2013 for the revolutionary Platinum Magna luggage collection.

Please visit the Travelpro website for a full list of the latest products and retail locations. You can also like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

A Behind-The-Scenes Look at TSA’s Baggage Check

September 9, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

Boarding a plane can be a hectic journey. You don’t want to miss your flight or forget your passport or go to the wrong terminal. But have you ever thought about the journey your bags go on once you check them?

CBS 46’s Pothole Harry did a fascinating behind the scenes report on where your luggage goes. At Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport, the world’s busiest airport, TSA screens about 30,000 bags per day. (One surprising tidbit: oftentimes, your luggage boards the plane before you do.)

The way the system works is that the Transportation Safety Administration has some very large scanners and an intricate conveyor belt. Each bag is sorted and scanned, as the system looks for questionable items, using an algorithm that looks for certain objects. If an item is found and flagged, the system then alerts an operator and the bag is sent for further inspection. Something may be considered questionable if it’s flammable, sharp like knives, or alive, like the suitcase full of live crabs someone had tried to check through the system.

TSA Bag CheckTSA will open your bag, inspect it, and then place a note in the bag that informs you of the search and identifies themselves. They do this so, when travelers open their suitcase and find things packed differently, they know why. If there are any questions about missing items, the name on the note will help the TSA identify who inspected your bag. There are also hundreds and thousands of security cameras in the inspection area to cut down on theft.

How our luggage is handled, where it goes, and who touches it is valuable information. Knowing the airlines and TSA have a solid system is important, because it ensures our safety in the air, and helps reduce the amount of lost luggage each year.

Photo credit: Bradley Gordon (Flickr, Creative Commons)

Seth Godin on Stress-Free Travel for People Who Stress Easily

August 26, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

Some people love to travel and find it very relaxing. It’s another adventure they can’t wait to take. Other people get very stressed, and they’re less interested in the journey than the destination. What if I forget something? Which gate has my flight? Did it change? Where do I get my ticket? What about security?

On of our favorite marketing authors, Seth Godin, came up with a witty list of anecdotes called “Self Assurance Checklist for the Anxious Traveler.”

Author Seth Godin at PDF 2007

Author Seth Godin at PDF 2007 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

We wondered if some of his points may be a little far-fetched — ship your favorite pillow to your destination ahead of time — but we all know people for whom this would be a very reassuring and important detail. They want to be sure of a good night’s sleep, and they don’t want a crick in their neck from sleeping on an under-stuffed and overused hotel pillow.

Godin makes points about planning, parking, and packing. Research the area around the takeoff airport, the landing airport, and the hotel in case you forgot to pack something or need to kill time. He also recommends taking a photo of where you parked and emailing it to a friend, in case you forget where you left your car.

The last suggestion may seem to be a bit much since you could just as easily look at the photo once you return to the parking lot, but it doesn’t hurt for that extra step of preparation in case you lost your phone or it died.

When it comes to packing, lay out the clothes you want to take a few days before the flight, and see if they’ll all fit into your luggage. If it doesn’t, eliminate what you can until it does. This way you know everything fits and that it’s all packed and ready to go.

Traveling does not have to be stressful, even for the most anxious of travelers. If you know you’re going to be nervous about your trip, and want to make sure you have all the bases covered, read Seth Godin’s list a few times, and take flight.

Share any tips that you use to reduce stress when traveling.

Travelpro Introduces National Geographic Explorer Cape Town and Leather Brief Collections

August 25, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

When Business or Adventure Calls, the Tough and Stylish National Geographic Explorer Cape Town Collection is Up for the Job

Travelpro, the inventor of Rollaboard luggage and a market leader in innovative, high-quality luggage design, is proud to partner with National Geographic, one of the world’s largest scientific and educational nonprofit organizations, to introduce the new National Geographic Explorer Cape Town and Leather Brief Collections.

“Around the world or around the block, the National Geographic Explorer Cape Town Collection brings together vintage styling with intelligent storage and a durable canvas fabric that’s perfect for today’s active traveler,” said Scott Applebee, Vice President of Marketing for the Travelpro family of brands. “Additionally, National Geographic’s net proceeds support vital exploration, conservation, research and education programs.”

National Geographic Cape Town Duffel

National Geographic Cape Town Duffel

The National Geographic Explorer Cape Town Collection features a single and double gusset briefcase, available in khaki and navy colors. Both briefcases feature comfortably-padded, adjustable shoulder straps, made of sturdy cotton webbing that will stand up to the rigors of world travel. A removable, padded sleeve holds laptops up to 15.6″ while the spacious main compartment is ideal for storage of a tablet, file folders and power cords. The front pocket business organizer holds pens, business cards, a phone and other small items.

For adventure or leisure travel, the Cape Town Collection’s 21″ duffel bag is the perfect carry-on bag. The cavernous main compartment with a rear zippered pocket is ideal for storing clothing, toiletries, electronics and the amenities travelers need. Available in khaki and navy, the 21″ Carry- On Duffel Bag’s padded shoulder strap and cushioned carry handle offer maximum comfort on long trips. Moreover, the interesting heat-embossed map lining captures the spirit of National Geographic.

When adventure calls, the collection’s versatile daypack makes travel a breeze. The main compartment and multiple exterior pockets provide ample storage space and organization for tablets, business cards, a smart phone, file folders, power cables and more. The Explorer Cape Town Collection also features a messenger bag that includes storage for up to a 15.6″ laptop and other business and travel essentials. The attractive flap-over design with antique buckle closures keeps contents secure. Both items are also available in khaki and navy colors.

National Geographic Leather Briefcase

National Geographic Leather Briefcase

Made of full grain, genuine leather, the National Geographic Explorer Leather Briefcase is a business workhorse. The rugged good looks of distressed leather make an impression in the boardroom or at the corner cafe. A removable, padded sleeve holds laptops up to a 15.6″ laptop or a tablet. Available in espresso and mocha leather colors, the brief blends good looks with ultimate functionality.

For additional information on the National Geographic Explorer Cape Town and Leather Brief Collections or any other of National Geographic or Travelpro’s expansive lines of luggage, please contact howard@gohrmc.com or call 305-573-0882.

About National Geographic

With a mission to inspire people to care about the planet, the 126-year-old National Geographic Society is one of the world’s largest nonprofit scientific and educational organizations. Working to inspire, illuminate and teach, the member-supported Society reaches over 600 million people worldwide each month through its media platforms, products and events. National Geographic has funded more than 11,000 research, conservation and exploration projects, and its education programs promote geographic literacy. For more information, visit www.nationalgeographic.com.

About Travelpro

For over 25 years, Travelpro International has prided itself on design innovation and durability in crafting the highest quality luggage for travelers worldwide. Since transforming the ease of modern day travel with The Original Rollaboard wheeled luggage, Travelpro has been the brand of choice for flight crews and frequent travelers worldwide. Travelpro is dedicated to building a lifelong relationship with its customers by consistently understanding and exceeding their needs. Travelpro was honored to receive the New Product Innovation Award from the Travel Goods Association (TGA) in March 2013 for the revolutionary Platinum Magna luggage collection.

Please visit the Travelpro website for a full list of the latest products and retail locations. You can also like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Bring This, Not That: Portable Battery Chargers

August 21, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

In light of the TSA’s new “no dead electronics” policy, not having any charge is more inconvenient than just not being able to check email or play Flappy Bird. If you can’t charge your phone at a TSA checkpoint, you can either have your phone sent to your home or they’ll keep it for you until you return to the airport.

And while people are asking that the TSA bring power outlets to those checkpoints, it may be a good idea to have a portable battery charger in your bag. Even if you’re not traveling on a plane, a batter charger may make your life easier.

Cell phone and battery charger

Cell phone and battery charger

For frequent travelers, a dead phone, laptop, or tablet can be a serious problem. People need more and longer power to be able to work and entertain themselves while on their journey. I have gone on long trips, and even though I power down before takeoff, my phone can still be at 10 or 15 percent when I get to my destination. If I’m not going to be near a wall socket for a few hours, that’s a problem.

Luckily, portable batteries are becoming more prevalent and more affordable for the everyday person. Until they figure out how to reconfigure batteries to last longer, portable batteries are a great option. We’ve found five of the “juiciest portable battery options”, according to an article on Digital Trends.

  • RAVPower Xtreme Portable External Battery Charger
  • Lumsing Harmonica Style Portable Power Bank
  • Anker 2nd Gen Astro3 Portable External Battery
  • Jackery Bar Portable Charger
  • EasyAcc Slim Power Bank Charger

These range from $20 to $100. They also vary in power capacity, how many devices you can hook up and the weight. The EasyAcc only weighs about a quarter pound, which is great for travelers who are limited by weight of baggage. A friend recently bought one from Amazon for $23, and he’s able to charge his Android phone 5 times.

Another option is the Pocket Socket Portable Hand Generator available on ThinkGeek.com. It requires a lot of hand cranking, but it’s very useful if you happen to be in the car, or are stuck in a zombie apocalypse, and far away from a power source.

For as light and inexpensive as these batteries are getting, they may end up being a great alternative to trying to find an outlet in the airport or at a restaurant to extend your battery life.

TSA’s New Smartphone Rules May Cause Bigger Problems

August 14, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

Thanks to new proposed rules regarding dead mobile phones and tablets, many travelers are worried about what could happen if their portable electronics die before they get through airport security.

The new rules require that all electronic devices must be able to be powered up at security, after it was revealed that Al Qaeda has figured out how to disguise bombs in electronic devices without detection. Currently, the only flights affected are those going into the United States, but not out of the country, or within it.

The Controversy

Cell phone and battery charger

Cell phone and battery charger

What happens when someone cannot power up his or her devices? According to an article by Conde Nast, the dead devices would be held at the airport or could be shipped to the owner’s house. If the devices are held at the airport, where would they be stored and what kind of security would oversee this storage? Many people have expressed concern at possibly being without their phones because of a dead battery, especially when their power cable is in their luggage.

The Costs

If the devices are to be shipped to the owner’s house, this method could be quite costly, especially for travelers returning to the US. Depending on how the policy is enacted and enforced, there could be a lot of confiscated devices to process.

One suggestion we’ve seen lately is to install electrical outlets and chargers at security stations. This means airports would have to relocate power supplies and install plugs. Then they would have to allow time for devices to charge enough to power up. However, this would solve the problem for travelers whose mobile device died in the airport. Another possibility would be charging stations outside security, where people can charge for several minutes before entering the line.

Will This Create Backups?

On the other hand, what kind of problems could be created as people fumble with dead phones, trying to charge them at the new stations, or even arranging them to have sent back home. And, what if you miss your flight? Though the new rules are for safety and security, the implementation process could cause quite a dilemma for many travelers if it’s not planned and implemented well.

Word to the wise: regardless of where you’re traveling, charge all your devices before heading out to catch your flight.

Gatwick Airport Tests Hi-Tech Security and Passenger Technology

August 12, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

Remember how impressed you were the first time you saw an airport faucet that turned on automatically when you waved your hand in front of them? (Don’t pretend you weren’t!)

It’s almost shocking how far airports have come technologically since then. Case in point: Gatwick Airport’s chief information officer, Michael Ibbitson, recently told FutureTravelExperience.com about the new technology that’s not just wowing passengers, but also streamlining the passenger experience and making travel safer for everyone. Let’s take a look at some of the technological advances Gatwick has made.

Speeding Up Bag Check

English: Gatwick South Terminal Zone K check-i...

Gatwick South Terminal Zone K check-in concourse (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Automated bag check and check-in are technologies well on their way to mass adoption at this point, but Gatwick is aiming to make them more efficient than ever.

EasyJet has been testing a bag drop system fueled by Phase 5 Technology at its Gatwick hub. According to Ibbitson, the average passenger took 76 seconds to process — the goal is to get passengers through in 45 — so they’re tweaking the system, working toward maximum efficiency.

Automated Security

One of the major headaches of air travel, no matter how far you’re traveling, is getting through security. Gatwick is attempting to make security checkpoints smoother by automating them — the systems installed in 2012 have cut wait time to an average of a mere 107 seconds — and installing Security Max lanes that will enable even more passengers to prepare for the checkpoint at once.

Iris Scanning Technology

The wildest technology we read about: Biometrics as a single passenger token. The gist is that when you check in at the airport and drop your bag off, a machine also scans your iris — an identity marker that’s almost impossible to forfeit — and all your passenger information, from baggage tracking to your passport and boarding pass, is encoded into the scan.

A single scan of your iris is all it takes to move you through the rest of the travel process throughout the airport — and even at your destination.

According to the Future Travel Experience post, this technology is well within reach — it’s the widespread implementation of the technology at airports worldwide that will take some time.

What technology would you most like to see implemented in your favorite airport? The sky’s the limit, so they say — leave a comment with your loftiest technology dreams.

How to Cope With The Worst Travel Scenarios

August 5, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

Not to diminish any travel woes you’ve experienced — trust me, we’ve all been through enough horrible delays and cancellations to know how frustrating they are — but after reading a recent Budget Travel blog post, I’m grateful for the low drama factor of my travel mishaps.

If you thought having your flight canceled and being stuck overnight is the worst it can get, think again. Here are a couple of the worst-case scenarios I hope you’ll never have to face.

Getting Arrested in a Foreign Country

English: Chancery of the Manila American Embas...

Chancery of the Manila American Embassy. Official photo from THE SECRETARY OF STATE’S REGISTER OF CULTURALLY SIGNIFICANT PROPERTY. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

We’ve all heard horror stories about winding up in a Thai prison…well, for some it’s a reality.

Cultural differences can sometimes translate into legal differences, too — or maybe you’ve just behaved very badly — but your first step in the right direction if you’ve gotten into legal trouble is to call the embassy. They may not be able to get you off the hook right away, but the embassy will at least help ensure that you have legal counsel.

It would also behoove you to check out the State Department’s website for insight into the customs and laws of the area you’re traveling to.

Finding Yourself in the Middle of a Natural Disaster

This actually happened to me back in the ’90s: During a sales meeting in Key West, Fla., a hurricane rolled through during the night. There was a lot of wind and rain and the power went out, but we were otherwise unaffected.

If you find yourself in a more severe situation, the best thing to do is listen to local authorities. Also be sure to contact family and loved ones as soon as possible to ensure they know you’re all right.

If you have access to the Internet, your local embassy’s website is a great resource for emergency personnel, hospitals and the like — but the Budget Travel article recommends finding a major hotel if you can’t get online and need to know what to do beyond following the authorities’ instructions.

Our favorite tip: Register your travel abroad with the State Department’s Smart Traveler Enrollment Program — we’d never heard of it until we read the Budget Travel blog post, but it’s a great idea and sounds easy to implement.

Have you experienced one of these nightmare travel scenarios? How did you react, and how did the situation turn out? Leave a comment and tell your story.

Better Than Wrinkle Cream? Travel’s Anti-Aging Effect

July 24, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

Here’s a sobering statistic: In a study of 2,300 American workers who get paid vacation, only 25 percent said they take advantage of every day they’re allowed. Sixty-one percent said they continued to work even while on vacation.

There are plenty of other blog posts — books, even — that could be written on American work culture and why we don’t take advantage of the benefits of our jobs. This blog post is a plea to consider traveling more.

Travel Keeps You Healthy

178.

(Photo credit: Deb Stgo)

Why? A recent article in the Dubai Chronicle documented the results of a survey several existing studies on leisure travel’s health effects and found that it actually boosts cognitive and cardiovascular health, particularly in middle-aged people or older.

One study, for example, followed women from 45 to 64 years old for 20 years; women in the study who took vacation twice a year were at much lower risk of having a heart attack or dying of a heart-related disease than those who traveled every six years.

If you’ve encountered significant delays and other frustrations during your travels, you may feel the exact opposite. But I think that to reap the anti-aging effects of travel, you have to flip the old adage around: It’s the destination, not the journey.

My Own Experience

I can personally attest to this, actually. My wife and I are fortunate enough to be able to travel to the Caribbean a fair amount, and it’s absolutely essential for helping us relax.

A big part of the relaxation for me is shaking up my routine and immersing myself in a totally different environment and culture, away from my everyday lifestyle. Vacation is an opportunity to shake yourself out of your deepest ruts.

I am, unfortunately, often part of that 61 percent of workers who continue to work while on vacation, but it’s for self-preservation. I go through my emails once a day and flag the important ones for my attention when I return. It only takes a few minutes and makes coming back to work the following week a lot less stressful.

I’d love to hear whether you connect with the findings of this survey. Do your vacations alleviate your stress levels? How do you cope with the stress of returning to a full inbox? Share your thoughts in the comments or on our Facebook page.

How to Avoid Being Stranded at the Airport

July 17, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

If you’re a frequent traveler, you know that feeling in the pit of your stomach when you get the notification: Flight canceled. There are few worse feelings when you’re headed to an important meeting, on a long-awaited vacation or — worst yet — home after a busy time away.

There’s a silver lining: Conde Nast Traveler’s The Daily Traveler blog published a post with some great tips for making your way home if your flight’s been canceled and you’re stuck at an airport.

A busy airport

(Photo credit: eGuide Travel)

The steps CN outlines are ones I haven’t given a lot of thought to honestly. I’ve had a few major cancellations happen to me in my travels — and while I don’t recommend it, I pretty much rely on my past experiences of “playing the game.” The key to winning said game? Make sure you have a lot of alternatives.

The first step for me has always been to approach the airline directly to find out your options. But from there, what you do depends on how badly you want to get home.

Having a sort of slush fund for a recovery budget is one thing CN’s article recommends. Recovery budgets and security measures like travel insurance can alleviate the financial burden of a canceled flight or long delay, but it doesn’t necessarily make getting home any easier.

When I lived in Michigan, I had a flight canceled during a snowstorm — there were no flights coming or going out of the Detroit airport. But we were headed to Grand Rapids, which was only a few hours’ drive — so my coworkers and I rented a car and drove through the snow to reach our final destination. (Renting a car is often cheaper than getting a hotel room.)

I encountered a similar situation in a past life, when I was working on the East Coast. I had a presentation to give in Hyde Park, N.Y., and our flight out of Philadelphia got canceled. We didn’t have the option to spend the night — we had a presentation to give and had to be there — so we drove six hours to our destination and made the presentation as planned.

However, the airline refused to surrender our luggage to us before we left, so we met our bags at the Hyde Park airport when the canceled flight eventually arrived. In that case, we just had to punt, wear the same clothes from the day before, and give the presentation. There are times the show must go on, regardless of what you’re wearing. (It was also a valuable lesson in why it’s better to travel with carry-on bags than checking them on short trips.)

If driving isn’t an option for you, my two favorite tips from CN’s article are to find an airport with a lot of flights and be open to alternate airports. If you’re reasonably flexible with your travel plans, you can often find another way home or to your destination with minimal pain.

What’s your biggest cancellation nightmare? Commiserate in the comments section and give us some ideas.

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