TSA Needs to be Consistent on New Security Rules for Electronics

October 7, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

The TSA is now requiring anyone flying into the US to be able to turn on their mobile phones and other mobile devices whenever prompted by security. Right now, the plan is only in effect for those traveling into the United States, but it could eventually become standard procedure here in the US.

So far, each airport has approached the policy differently. Heathrow Airport in the UK is checking devices at the gate while others are checking them at security or at check-in. Many people are confused by the new rules, with a lack of consistent direction from the airports.

Check-In Counter at London Heathrow

Check-In Counter at London Heathrow

Heathrow has put up signs to instruct people about the device policy, and others should be following their lead soon. Airlines and airports will be posting the policy on their websites to allow for more people to understand the new policy before arriving at the airport.

At Travelpro, we’re curious whether the security will screen every single device or randomly select based on some criteria. TSA recently released a statement that said that “officers may also ask that owners power up their devices,” which suggests that not everyone will be required to.

We also wonder how the TSA will enforce this policy? Most of the screening will be done overseas and therefore under other countries’ control. Will TSA require certain regulations and reports? Will this be a cooperative effort between all the countries?

All airport security processes are somewhat networked, but they’re also independent. Therefore, they don’t have to follow each others’ rules and requirements. However, because each agency and country is concerned with security, we would hope that they would work together to ensure everyone’s safety.

If you are unsure how the device policy is going to work and you are traveling, call the airport or search on their website to find more information. Homeland Security has commanded TSA to regulate this policy with little disruption if possible, so we hope this will be the case for all travelers in the future.

The best move for a traveler is to have their mobile devices charged before arriving at the airport. If you are chosen to turn on your device, you will be prepared.

Bring This, Not That: Three Unnecessary Travel Items

September 25, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

Sometimes, knowing what to bring on a trip can get confusing, especially if you love your gadgets and want to bring them on the road. A video article by Matt Granite from USA Today had some good advice on what not to bring on your next flight.

Travel Adapters

Granite: Travel adapters are unnecessary. Most hotels accommodate you and your electrical needs. They take up a lot of space as well.

Single travel adapter for Europe and Asia

Single travel adapter for Europe and Asia

Travelpro: We disagree. Yes, you shouldn’t buy the adapter kit with 20 pieces, because you’ll most likely only need one style. However, imagine getting to your hotel and not being able to charge your phone. Do some research to find out what kind of adapter you will need, and just bring that, not all the adapters for every country.

It’s important to weigh the costs for this too. If you frequently travel around the world, the 20 piece kit is probably the best route for you. But if you’re taking that once-in-a-lifetime trip to Paris, go for the single adapter only.

GPS

Granite: Why bring an extra device when you can just use a mobile GPS app? Your GPS is the most likely item to get stolen.

Travelpro: Agreed. Another device is unnecessary. However there are some factors to think about when opting for the app. It drains your battery, can go into roaming, which will hike up your data usage, and is a lot smaller than a GPS. Better yet, consider a map as your primary wayfinder, and use your phone GPS for fine tuning or when you get lost.

Bluetooth Shower Speakers

Granite: Pointless, poor audio quality, and overpriced. Skip the shower speakers, and get a regular speaker instead.

Travelpro: We sort of agree on the speakers. Why not just endure your 10 minute shower without music at all? You want to save as much space and weight as possible, and a bluetooth speaker of any kind is just going to take up both.

But if you simply must sing in the shower, we recommend Nude Audio’s Super M as an all-in-one speaker. It’s bluetooth, water- and sand-proof, offers a 360-degree sound experience, is compact and durable, and costs $99.

Tech gear is one of those optional things. Other than some kind of power adapter, you don’t need a GPS (travelers have survived forever without them), and you certainly don’t need a speaker for your mobile device. Go as light as possible, leave the unnecessary gear at home, and experience what your destination has to offer, including the music.

Airline Industry Putting $Millions Into New Terminals

September 18, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

An airline terminal can be a relaxing place to sit for a moment, after rushing and scrambling with last minute packing. Or it can be stressful with the chaos of other travelers anxious to get home. Airlines are hoping it will be the former, making it a place where more people are willing to spend time, relax, shop, and eat. Many airports are pouring in millions, if not billions, of dollars into renovation projects.

SFO Open House - Thom WatsonWe’ve talked about some of the ways airports are trying to enhance travelers’ experience such as the efficiency of baggage screening and the use of wearable technology. Airports are also revamping the themselves, according to a recent USA Today article.

Examples of the grandiose projects

  • San Francisco International Airport completed a $138 million project that features free wifi and even a yoga room.
  • Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport’s renovation features kiosks that print boarding passes and luggage tags.
  • The Los Angeles International Airport remade the Tom Bradley International Terminal to let in a lot of natural light through massive windows. It also has an aluminum roof resembling ocean waves.

Enjoyment and productivity for flier

These renovations will enhance both the enjoyment and productivity for the fliers in these areas. Not only is there free wifi for everyone, but there are even work stations and additional power outlets to get work done while you’re waiting. (If your airport doesn’t have additional outlets, here are a few backup battery options.)

Airports are also putting more of their region’s personality into their terminals, adding architectural flair, since it’s the last or first place a flier will see of their city. And they’re adding more and more dining options, including several local restaurants for more of that local “flavor.”

Of course, some people may not appreciate the renovations, because it either means fewer flights during renovation, or more likely, you have to navigate all the construction chaos to get to your gate. Renovations also cost a lot of money, which may mean an increase in ticket prices. And finally, some fliers just don’t want all the extra gadgets or bonuses, so they may not see what all the fuss is about.

But for those of us who travel a lot and sometimes feel like the airport is our second home, these improvements are much needed, much welcomed, and much appreciated. They may be inconvenient at times, but they’re being done to make your flying experience more convenient and stress free.

Photo credit: Thom Watson (Flickr, Creative Commons)

New Crew 10 Luggage Promotional Video

September 17, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

This is our latest video for our newest line, the Crew 10 series. We’re very proud of our new line and the changes and improvements we’ve made.

How to Get Results When Travel Goes Wrong

September 16, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

Things are going to go wrong when you travel. Maybe not this time, but soon. Something will happen, and you — understandably — won’t be happy. It could be lost luggage or bad weather causing major flight delays. An article from Peter Greenberg this past spring discusses how to get results when something goes wrong during a trip. Getting positive results boils down to having manners and being polite toward other passengers and the airline staff.

There are five things we should or should not do when dealing with travel problems.

1. Don’t call customer service

Check-In Counter at London HeathrowCustomer service is there to deal with complaints, but they may not have the power to say “yes.” They can easily say “no,” however. Peter suggests going to someone who has the ability to say yes, so avoid calling the customer service line. Also, if you’re having problems with your current flight, skip the desk at your gate. Go to an empty gate for your airline and ask them for help. They’re plugged into the same system as your own gate.

2. Do address the problem right when it happens

Waiting until you get home or arrive at your destination will put extra distance between yourself, the problem, and those who can help fix it. It may mean staying in the airport, or hanging around the hotel a little longer. Keep your travel time a little padded for emergencies anyway.

3. Keep all documents, names, and receipts

If you’ve ever tried to return a purchased item without a receipt, you know how tough that can be. Without proof, they won’t budge. Keeping all information related to the incident will allow for those trying to help you to do so in a more efficient manner. If you have this information readily available, they’re more able (and likely) to help you.

4. Use your credit card

This is important enough that it’s worth doing every day. Not only do you get travel points (if you have one of those kinds of cards), but thanks to the Fair Credit Billing Act, you can also dispute an unknown or unwanted charge to that card. For example, if you did not order room service in your hotel, you can dispute it, as long as you paid for the room with your credit card.

5. Have an alternative to suggest

One suggestion we came up with after reading Greenberg’s article is to have an alternative when addressing a problem. For example, if a flight is delayed due to bad weather, ask the gate agent if an alternate route is available, and suggest a few possibilities yourself. That will make their job easier, because they will not have to spend extra time researching alternatives.

While you’re not going to have major problems on every trip you take, it helps to be prepared, and to be polite and have a positive attitude when dealing with others. You’ll get more done, and you’re more likely to get the desired outcome.

Photo credit: Travel Collector (Flickr, Creative Commons)

Travelpro Product Testing Featured on NBC’s “The List”

September 15, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

NBC’s The List, a show that airs in Phoenix, Tampa, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Tulsa, Baltimore, and West Palm Beach, recently visited our luggage testing facility here in Boca Raton, Florida to see how we put our luggage to the (rigorous and rough) test before it ever reaches the store.

Travelpro Debuts the Crew Executive Choice Business Case Collection (PRESS RELEASE)

September 10, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

Providing the Most Innovative Luggage and Business Cases for Today’s Frequent Business Travelers

Travelpro, the inventor of Rollaboard luggage and a market leader in innovative, high-quality luggage design is pleased to introduce the Crew Executive Choice Business Case Collection. This premium business case line enhances Travelpro’s flagship Crew luggage collection by integrating some highly functional briefcases, backpacks and overnighters into the overall offering. Genuine leather accents and durable fabrics enable the business traveler to travel in confidence with the latest advances in luggage and business cases, all from one compatible product offering.

“The Crew Executive Choice Collection’s attention to detail, confident style and functional efficiency are a reflection of Travelpro’s commitment to its customers and business travelers worldwide,” said Scott Applebee, Vice President of Marketing for the Travelpro family of brands.

Crew Executive Choice Collection

Crew Executive Choice Collection


The Crew Executive Choice Rolling Business Overnighter is an ideal choice for the executive that demands it all: durability, convenience, versatility and a fashionable look that makes a bold statement. An ideal carry-on size for short trips, the Rolling Business Overnighter is built for maximum efficiency with a patented PowerScope Extension handle, which minimizes wobble when fully extended and stops at 42″ ensuring a comfortable roll for users of varying heights. A built-in corduroy, padded pocket protects laptops up to 15.6″ in size, and the business organizer keeps pens, pencils, business cards and keys in place for easy access.

Crew Executive Choice Checkpoint-Friendly Backpack

Crew Executive Choice Checkpoint-Friendly Backpack

The Checkpoint Friendly Computer Backpack is the perfect complement to Travelpro Crew 10 Carry-on luggage. With its one-of-a-kind Quick Loop system, the Backpack can be attached to all existing Travelpro luggage for convenient transport through airport terminals. The Backpack also provides protection against loss and identity theft with an RFID-blocking pocket that keeps all credit cards and passports safe. The highly featured backpack is Checkpoint Friendly, featuring a padded pocket for 15.6″ laptops, plus a tablet pocket and a removable cord pouch for power cables and accessories. Adjustable, padded shoulder straps provide comfort for users of different heights.

Genuine leather handles combined with sturdy nylon fabric make the Checkpoint Friendly Messenger Brief and Checkpoint Friendly Slim Brief, a stylish and damage resistant option for business travelers on the go. Checkpoint friendly design allows the traveler to keep their laptop inside the bag while going through the security x-ray machine at the airport. Each item is equipped with a RFID-blocking security pocket, Quick Loop system, a padded and quilted corduroy pocket that fits a 15.6″ laptop, a separate, padded tablet pocket and a built-in business organizer for quick access storage of key business essentials.

The Business Tote is the ideal case for the female business traveler who wants to combine style and functionality. The tote features a removable padded sleeve for laptops up to 15.6″ and a separate tablet pocket to protect multiple electronic devices safely. A removable cord pouch, RFID-blocking security pocket and business organizer keeps everything organized and safe. Genuine leather straps and trim add a touch of elegance and style.

About Travelpro

For over 25 years, Travelpro International has prided itself on design innovation and durability in crafting the highest quality luggage for travelers worldwide. Since transforming the ease of modern day travel with The Original Rollaboard wheeled luggage, Travelpro has been the brand of choice for flight crews and frequent travelers worldwide. Travelpro is dedicated to building a lifelong relationship with its customers by consistently understanding and exceeding their needs. Travelpro was honored to receive the New Product Innovation Award from the Travel Goods Association (TGA) in March 2013 for the revolutionary Platinum Magna luggage collection.

Please visit the Travelpro website for a full list of the latest products and retail locations. You can also like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

A Behind-The-Scenes Look at TSA’s Baggage Check

September 9, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

Boarding a plane can be a hectic journey. You don’t want to miss your flight or forget your passport or go to the wrong terminal. But have you ever thought about the journey your bags go on once you check them?

CBS 46’s Pothole Harry did a fascinating behind the scenes report on where your luggage goes. At Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport, the world’s busiest airport, TSA screens about 30,000 bags per day. (One surprising tidbit: oftentimes, your luggage boards the plane before you do.)

The way the system works is that the Transportation Safety Administration has some very large scanners and an intricate conveyor belt. Each bag is sorted and scanned, as the system looks for questionable items, using an algorithm that looks for certain objects. If an item is found and flagged, the system then alerts an operator and the bag is sent for further inspection. Something may be considered questionable if it’s flammable, sharp like knives, or alive, like the suitcase full of live crabs someone had tried to check through the system.

TSA Bag CheckTSA will open your bag, inspect it, and then place a note in the bag that informs you of the search and identifies themselves. They do this so, when travelers open their suitcase and find things packed differently, they know why. If there are any questions about missing items, the name on the note will help the TSA identify who inspected your bag. There are also hundreds and thousands of security cameras in the inspection area to cut down on theft.

How our luggage is handled, where it goes, and who touches it is valuable information. Knowing the airlines and TSA have a solid system is important, because it ensures our safety in the air, and helps reduce the amount of lost luggage each year.

Photo credit: Bradley Gordon (Flickr, Creative Commons)

Seth Godin on Stress-Free Travel for People Who Stress Easily

August 26, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

Some people love to travel and find it very relaxing. It’s another adventure they can’t wait to take. Other people get very stressed, and they’re less interested in the journey than the destination. What if I forget something? Which gate has my flight? Did it change? Where do I get my ticket? What about security?

On of our favorite marketing authors, Seth Godin, came up with a witty list of anecdotes called “Self Assurance Checklist for the Anxious Traveler.”

Author Seth Godin at PDF 2007

Author Seth Godin at PDF 2007 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

We wondered if some of his points may be a little far-fetched — ship your favorite pillow to your destination ahead of time — but we all know people for whom this would be a very reassuring and important detail. They want to be sure of a good night’s sleep, and they don’t want a crick in their neck from sleeping on an under-stuffed and overused hotel pillow.

Godin makes points about planning, parking, and packing. Research the area around the takeoff airport, the landing airport, and the hotel in case you forgot to pack something or need to kill time. He also recommends taking a photo of where you parked and emailing it to a friend, in case you forget where you left your car.

The last suggestion may seem to be a bit much since you could just as easily look at the photo once you return to the parking lot, but it doesn’t hurt for that extra step of preparation in case you lost your phone or it died.

When it comes to packing, lay out the clothes you want to take a few days before the flight, and see if they’ll all fit into your luggage. If it doesn’t, eliminate what you can until it does. This way you know everything fits and that it’s all packed and ready to go.

Traveling does not have to be stressful, even for the most anxious of travelers. If you know you’re going to be nervous about your trip, and want to make sure you have all the bases covered, read Seth Godin’s list a few times, and take flight.

Share any tips that you use to reduce stress when traveling.

Travelpro Introduces National Geographic Explorer Cape Town and Leather Brief Collections

August 25, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

When Business or Adventure Calls, the Tough and Stylish National Geographic Explorer Cape Town Collection is Up for the Job

Travelpro, the inventor of Rollaboard luggage and a market leader in innovative, high-quality luggage design, is proud to partner with National Geographic, one of the world’s largest scientific and educational nonprofit organizations, to introduce the new National Geographic Explorer Cape Town and Leather Brief Collections.

“Around the world or around the block, the National Geographic Explorer Cape Town Collection brings together vintage styling with intelligent storage and a durable canvas fabric that’s perfect for today’s active traveler,” said Scott Applebee, Vice President of Marketing for the Travelpro family of brands. “Additionally, National Geographic’s net proceeds support vital exploration, conservation, research and education programs.”

National Geographic Cape Town Duffel

National Geographic Cape Town Duffel

The National Geographic Explorer Cape Town Collection features a single and double gusset briefcase, available in khaki and navy colors. Both briefcases feature comfortably-padded, adjustable shoulder straps, made of sturdy cotton webbing that will stand up to the rigors of world travel. A removable, padded sleeve holds laptops up to 15.6″ while the spacious main compartment is ideal for storage of a tablet, file folders and power cords. The front pocket business organizer holds pens, business cards, a phone and other small items.

For adventure or leisure travel, the Cape Town Collection’s 21″ duffel bag is the perfect carry-on bag. The cavernous main compartment with a rear zippered pocket is ideal for storing clothing, toiletries, electronics and the amenities travelers need. Available in khaki and navy, the 21″ Carry- On Duffel Bag’s padded shoulder strap and cushioned carry handle offer maximum comfort on long trips. Moreover, the interesting heat-embossed map lining captures the spirit of National Geographic.

When adventure calls, the collection’s versatile daypack makes travel a breeze. The main compartment and multiple exterior pockets provide ample storage space and organization for tablets, business cards, a smart phone, file folders, power cables and more. The Explorer Cape Town Collection also features a messenger bag that includes storage for up to a 15.6″ laptop and other business and travel essentials. The attractive flap-over design with antique buckle closures keeps contents secure. Both items are also available in khaki and navy colors.

National Geographic Leather Briefcase

National Geographic Leather Briefcase

Made of full grain, genuine leather, the National Geographic Explorer Leather Briefcase is a business workhorse. The rugged good looks of distressed leather make an impression in the boardroom or at the corner cafe. A removable, padded sleeve holds laptops up to a 15.6″ laptop or a tablet. Available in espresso and mocha leather colors, the brief blends good looks with ultimate functionality.

For additional information on the National Geographic Explorer Cape Town and Leather Brief Collections or any other of National Geographic or Travelpro’s expansive lines of luggage, please contact howard@gohrmc.com or call 305-573-0882.

About National Geographic

With a mission to inspire people to care about the planet, the 126-year-old National Geographic Society is one of the world’s largest nonprofit scientific and educational organizations. Working to inspire, illuminate and teach, the member-supported Society reaches over 600 million people worldwide each month through its media platforms, products and events. National Geographic has funded more than 11,000 research, conservation and exploration projects, and its education programs promote geographic literacy. For more information, visit www.nationalgeographic.com.

About Travelpro

For over 25 years, Travelpro International has prided itself on design innovation and durability in crafting the highest quality luggage for travelers worldwide. Since transforming the ease of modern day travel with The Original Rollaboard wheeled luggage, Travelpro has been the brand of choice for flight crews and frequent travelers worldwide. Travelpro is dedicated to building a lifelong relationship with its customers by consistently understanding and exceeding their needs. Travelpro was honored to receive the New Product Innovation Award from the Travel Goods Association (TGA) in March 2013 for the revolutionary Platinum Magna luggage collection.

Please visit the Travelpro website for a full list of the latest products and retail locations. You can also like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

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